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81
Readiris has a demo version.

Most scanners these days seem to scan direct to PDF.

If the print on the typewritten pages are light, one option would be to take the pages to a self-serve copier and make copies yourself, putting them on the darkest setting so you get nice, dark copies.  Then scan the copies.

How old is your scanner?  For typewritten pages, even an old scanner with 300dpi resolution should do the job.


One of my relatives wrote a diary which I want to digitize to ensure it's never lost.

What are your expectations regarding "never lost"?

For digital preservation, scan to PDF.  You can use OCR/typing too if you want to preserve the text as text rather than a scanned image.  Keep both the scanned PDF and the OCR'd/typed text file.  That way, you preserve an electronic version of the original document as well as the text.

Keep the digital files on multiple forms of media.  At least two.  That means hard drive and maybe a CD/DVD.  M-DISC if possible too.  Keep backups.  An off-site backup is also recommended.  Also, a physical hard drive, rather than SSD, would be preferable.  Store CDs/DVDs in a dry, temperature-controlled, dark place.  Keep backup hard drives in a suitable location.  Put in a Faraday cage if possible.

For physical preservation, make copies on acid-free, archival-quality paper.  Use either a high-end copy machine or digital press or an inkjet printer.  Less expensive copy machines or home laser printers may be prone to sticking if the pages are exposed to pressure (stored under/between books) or heat.  Keep a copy in a waterproof, fire-proof safe.  Keep an off-site copy.  Distributing copies to other relatives may also be a good idea.
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Marketing Loft [Public] / Re: I'm Going Wide in 2021
« Last post by LilyBLily on May 05, 2021, 01:58:02 AM »
I think the choice depends on the type of book you publish. My western romances are the kinds of books KU subscribers read. My women's fiction, not so much, and I am unwilling to cannibalize my high prices and go for page reads alone. I keep them wide and I don't start them in KU, either.   

83
As someone who can insert more errors into a retyping job than the OCR scanning creates, I'm on the side of better OCR, not typing. Is there a copy shop (or what used to be called one) that can handle the job for you? They would have better scanners than your home version and know when to adjust for the lightness.

No idea.

And I'm not sure I'd trust to anyone.

I'm not apposed to getting a much better scanner.
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As someone who can insert more errors into a retyping job than the OCR scanning creates, I'm on the side of better OCR, not typing. Is there a copy shop (or what used to be called one) that can handle the job for you? They would have better scanners than your home version and know when to adjust for the lightness.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: Any recommendations for scanning old typewriter pages?
« Last post by JackT on May 04, 2021, 09:26:40 PM »
The same for me - it's usually quicker to re-type than to correct OCR.

Another option is to scan each page and convert them to PDF. That's what I did with my old type-written diaries. I then uploaded a (rather large) file to Lulu and got it printed out as a book. It was time consuming to do but a good end result.
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As a matter of disclaimer, I should point out that I usually retype rather than use OCR.  Even the best OCR software will have errors and I generally find it faster to retype rather than run through OCR and then edit.
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I've used Readiris.  Does a decent job.

With old typewriter pages, it would probably help to set the scanner to darken while scanning.

I usually use a high-end scanner on a digital press, so that's not likely going to be an option for you.  My father has a real good desk scanner.  Can't remember the name of it offhand, but they don't make it anymore anyway.  They have a newer model available but it gets fairly bad reviews especially compared to the older version.
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Anyone have any recommendations for scanners and OCR programs specifically for scanning and converting to text very old typewriter pages? I'm talking 60-70 year old typewriter.

One of my relatives wrote a diary which I want to digitize to ensure it's never lost.

But so far, I've been unable to achieve a good enough OCR conversion to be useful. At the moment, typing it in from scratch is a better option. And I'd rather not.

Anyone done this recently? If so, how?

I'm quite happy to upgrade scanner and OCR, but no idea what is worth getting and what isn't.

I've already tried and rejected all the testable tablet apps, and my existing old scanner and free OCR. Not going to invest in a paid OCR without at least seeing a successful convert first.
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Marketing Loft [Public] / Re: I'm Going Wide in 2021
« Last post by Lorri Moulton on May 04, 2021, 12:44:43 PM »
So if you guys were going to pack it in and not do anything in terms of promotion/advertising but just leave your books up there would you do that wide or KU?

Wide.  Definitely.  I can have free books available all the time to bring readers into series and I've been getting more sales on Apple (through D2D) than I expected.  The other retailers are slowly picking up, and D2D has some nice promos. 

My advertising consists of social media (no paid ads), free books, and the occasional Fussy Librarian promo.

ETA: My focus in on brand awareness and getting readers to my website.  If I was focused on sales only, I would probably be trying paid advertising...but it just seems like too much work at the moment. 
And I really need to get some books finished this summer and fall!  :dog1:
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Marketing Loft [Public] / Re: Now I know why I will never get a BookBub
« Last post by alhawke on May 04, 2021, 10:11:47 AM »
Ha, ha! Maybe I need to up the ante. I'll keep applying  :tap
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