Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1
Writer's Workshop [Public] / Re: Steps for audiobook production
« Last post by alhawke on Today at 07:56:23 AM »
Voices plus or standard distribution with Findaway?

I thought about having samples available. I think I'm unable to do this by contract if I choose voices plus. But voices plus allows more promotion. Any of you who used Findaway have any thoughts on this? It reminds me a little of KU but there's not many retailers I'm aware of out of their network.
2
Writer's Workshop [Public] / Re: Steps for audiobook production
« Last post by alhawke on Today at 07:54:58 AM »
So once audio is complete, I can submit US copyright? That's my plan. With books, they ask for a download of an efile. I assume they will ask for a download copy of the full audio??
3
This is off-topic but surely I couldn't be the only person who shouted 'What?' when seeing the Glass Onion  screenwriting Oscar nomination?
4
Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: Silly Spammers
« Last post by Post-Crisis D on Today at 07:05:24 AM »
Oh, silly spammers . . .

"If your is still in the market for additional funding . . ."

I mean, wow.

On top of that, it was sent to my eMail address and the company name listed is mine, but it isn't addressed to me.  The last name is my father's first name and the first name is something out of Battlestar Galactica.

:icon_think:
5
Thanks for posting. It was interesting.

And while I agree in general, the article mixed essays with non-fiction with fiction, and all from different eras, as well as works intended for different audiences. I found this to be less helpful than was probably intended. So many of the classic writers were all about author intrusion and showing us how clever they were. An irritating tendency that spoils a lot of modern fiction as well. While I appreciate great literary sentences, they always kick me right out of the story. For me, literary fiction is about the ideas more so than the prose.

Eh, people like writers who are out primarily to prove how clever they are. Rian Johnson, Aaron Sorkin, David E Kelly, and a ton of other soapboxers, remain popular. I can't stand them because everything they write feels like they're shouting LOOK HOW RIGHT/SMART I AM!!!! EVERYONE ELSE IS AN IDIOT! NO, I WOULD NEVER STOOP TO CONSIDERING THE REASON WHY THEY ARE IDIOTS! THEY'RE NOT WORTH CONSIDERING CAUSE THEY'RE SO DUMB.

But people like feeling as if they're on the side of the smugly self-righteous.
6
Thanks for posting. It was interesting.

And while I agree in general, the article mixed essays with non-fiction with fiction, and all from different eras, as well as works intended for different audiences. I found this to be less helpful than was probably intended. So many of the classic writers were all about author intrusion and showing us how clever they were. An irritating tendency that spoils a lot of modern fiction as well. While I appreciate great literary sentences, they always kick me right out of the story. For me, literary fiction is about the ideas more so than the prose.

As for the every noun needs an adjective - in 2023, I think this is a newbie mistake. Usually, the adjectives are meaningless, only appearing because the writer thinks they need them, not because they serve a purpose. I see this when writers haven't worked out what they're trying to say, which is usually due to a lack of rewriting and editing.

I also think the subject ignores the 'show don't tell' approach. Classic literature often follows a very different style from many modern writers, combining lots of ideas and presenting them with a bit of a lecturing style. For example:

Quote
He sat down in the cold wet grass.

The more immersive approach would be to have previously established that it had recently rained and that it was also cold. Now, when the man sits, we already know that the grass is both wet and cold. This allows the reader to experience the story in real time as opposed to being lectured to after the fact. As it stands, the man is already on the grass before we know it's wet. With the show approach, the reader will be anticipating the coming wetness because we've all sat in wet grass before. It's usually pretty yucky. If we connect this with metaphor or characterization it will resonate even more. Narratively, we have to wonder if it matters if the man sits, stands or dances in the grass, regardless of its dampness. Why do his actions or his surroundings matter to the narrative or the reading experience?

The last thing the article ignores is the necessity of rhythm in prose. Sometime long sentences, even ones that take a minute to sink in, work because they're surrounded by a structure that enhances the momentum or suspense of the passage, such as setting off longer sentences with fragments.

All in all, of course we want to be clear, but fiction is also about emotion. We have to be careful not to let our desire for clarity dilute the emotion on the page. For example, we don't want our stories to read like non-fiction. Sorry, this makes sense in my head.

Anyway, just some thoughts.
7
Writer's Workshop [Public] / Re: Steps for audiobook production
« Last post by PJ Post on Today at 02:28:02 AM »
All fixed versions of any Creative endeavor need a separate copyright for legal protection (short story, book, serial, movie, cartoon, audio performance, public reading, etc.). With that said, the act of fixing the work grants it (you) an automatic copyright. So it's debatable how important registration really is. However, if your IP blows up into a million dollar revenue stream, registration is a pretty good idea, otherwise...meh. Of course, even for the average IP, it certainly won't hurt, and it's not all the expensive or time consuming to do. Generally speaking though, the main reason for copyrights and trademarks is to protect the Creative from BS claims and litigation being filed against them, more so than to protect the IP itself from theft or piracy. It's a defensive measure.

There's two types of copyrights at work here:

The composition - or the IP. This grants the holder the right to collect revenue from unit sales (publishing rights/mechanical royalties).
And the recording performance itself. This grants the holder the right to collect performance royalties. You'll want to get a Transfer of these Rights if you're not the one doing the recording to simplify your life. I assume this is pretty standard in the industry.

Don't think of AI narration as AI, just think of it as narration. It's no different than if you used MS Word to narrate the work. This is common on YouTube, and the work is still protected-ish. But the important thing to think about here is what this copyright is protecting - (public) Performance Royalties. How often do we hear a recording of a book in the wild? Or samples being used? The most common transgressor here is, again, YouTube (or TikTok or Instagram) - a fan using the recording on their channel, better known as free advertising. So there's no reason to complain about that.

With that said, Bill may be correct, but not because of any AI legal concern. If the book is simply narrated (by computer or app) without any additional work, such as music or sound effects - there's not really anything to copyright per se on the performance side of things, because there are no performing rights to protect. It makes the copyright moot. Copyright litigation requires proof of both standing and harm. MS Word can prove neither.

This is a great article explaining copyrights for music, which is pretty much the same for audio books because they're both sound recordings of a composition.

https://lawyerdrummer.com/2020/10/the-2-copyrights-in-a-song/

And for audio book sound recording:

https://www.sidebarsaturdays.com/2017/07/01/httpwp-mep7vddb-td/

8
Interesting essay, and timely for me as I just spent the previous two hours refining my own language in my current ms. Thanks. I shall not allow any of my characters to deem anything aloud.
9
Writer's Workshop [Public] / Re: Steps for audiobook production
« Last post by Bill Hiatt on Today at 12:25:50 AM »
But what about copyrighting an AI audiobook?
The copyright office's position at the moment is that AI work can't be copyrighted. That makes copyrighting depend on how much human intervention is involved. (Of course, you wrote the whole text, but the copyright of the content is a separate issue.)

Leaving that issue aside for a moment, the answer would also depend on the agreement with the company providing the AI services. If the work were copyrightable, it would be copyrightable by the company unless there is the equivalent of a work-for-hire agreement in place. I'm assuming large companies would have such an agreement in place, but it would be best to check the language.
10
Writer's Workshop [Public] / Re: How to write clearly (essay by Francine Prose)
« Last post by cecilia_writer on January 26, 2023, 06:36:28 PM »
Oddly, the way the piece is formatted makes it very difficult to read on my tablet so I haven't had the stamina to get through the whole thing. I think George Orwell is another possible example of someone who wrote very clearly.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10