Recent Posts

Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
91
Book Talk [Public] / Re: Barnes & Noble Sets Itself Free
« Last post by TimothyEllis on October 23, 2023, 12:17:29 PM »
There's one forum guru who absolutely refuses to acknowledge the validity of those of us who'd rather have good read-a-book vision and use glasses for distance than vice versa.

I've done that. After decades using triple vision graded glasses, I went back to intermediate single vision.

I've also got long vision only for driving.

If I want reading which the intermediate isn't enough for (like pill bottles), I just take my glasses off. Took me decades to figure that one out.  :hehe

My reading device and Word are both on bigger font sizes than normal though, but it all works for me.

And it saves the long hassle of getting them to do 3 graded lenses right, because they normally don't.

My normal glasses are for walking around the house, and reading the monitor. Everything else is secondary.

Bonus to this is my feet are no longer blurry as I walk around.
92
Book Talk [Public] / Re: Barnes & Noble Sets Itself Free
« Last post by elleoco on October 23, 2023, 07:03:36 AM »
Bookstores were never my idea of fun either. People rave about the Tattered Cover in Denver, but I almost always had to leave before finding anything I wanted because of rising nausea. Admittedly that was from their coffee bar. At a guess their flavored coffees had the too sweet smell. But give me Amazon any time, search, find, read blurb, read sample, order or keep looking. No drive, no parking, no weird smell.

My idea of socialization is not shopping in person. It's lunch with a friend or the neighborhood coffee group, but I admit to always marching to a different drummer. I order more and more stuff online these days and would probably even do it for groceries if it weren't for the fact I don't want anyone choosing fruit, vegetables, or meat for me.

For more pessimistic info -- I'm looking at cataract surgery in the near future and found a patient forum on that subject that's really been helpful. However, you can't believe how many people think "functional" or "practical" reading vision is good enough, meaning they can read a text on their phone or labels on grocery products, even if that's without crystal clarity. They admit in order to read for any length of time, as in read a book, they'd need reading glasses, but that's not a big deal because they rarely if ever read a book. There's one forum guru who absolutely refuses to acknowledge the validity of those of us who'd rather have good read-a-book vision and use glasses for distance than vice versa.
93
Book Talk [Public] / Re: Barnes & Noble Sets Itself Free
« Last post by TimothyEllis on October 23, 2023, 01:41:01 AM »
Same with me. It was fun browsing stores for CDs and DVDs with friends. Those days seem to be gone :icon_sad:

Bookstores was never that for me. Too many times you went in and came out with nothing. That was the problem in Australia. So many good books which were never released here by the Trads. Which I only found much later on Kindle.

But that was true of DVD hunting, up until they redesigned the store I normally went to, and suddenly I had a hard time finding anything due to the new layout.

At that point I started buying online a lot more, and then then stopped going to malls completely.
94
Book Talk [Public] / Re: Barnes & Noble Sets Itself Free
« Last post by alhawke on October 23, 2023, 01:35:25 AM »
But that doesn't mean I don't still desire to visit a book store. I spent so many pleasurable hours in book stores when I was younger
Same with me. It was fun browsing stores for CDs and DVDs with friends. Those days seem to be gone :icon_sad:
95
Book Talk [Public] / Re: Barnes & Noble Sets Itself Free
« Last post by Bill Hiatt on October 22, 2023, 11:50:55 PM »
My local Best Buys stopped selling DVDs years ago. I guess they must have been ahead of their time.

Like LilyBLily, I prefer ebooks for space reasons. My book collection has filled almost all the space available for it. I now only order physical books if an ebook is not available, and the book is something I want to use for research. (I often like to root my fantasy in real-world mythology and folklore. And occasionally, I also find quirky things, like a book contained the original floorplan of a historic house I wanted to use in one of my novels.)

But that doesn't mean I don't still desire to visit a book store. I spent so many pleasurable hours in book stores when I was younger (and they were so much more readily available). I found an outlet by building a classroom library (which, much to my horror, was all thrown out shortly after I retired instead of being passed on to my successor). I also ascertained how many books the school library had space for in different genres and then started donating books from my outside reading lists (titles my students could select for book reports). The librarian was very pleased, the students liked the convenience, and it gave me a reason to visit what few bookstores I could find.

(The school library also has my first six books. They'd have my whole collection, but the librarian who knew me and loved having on author on campus has since retired. her immediate successor didn't stick around long, so now, the librarian is someone who doesn't know me at all.)
96
Book Talk [Public] / Re: Barnes & Noble Sets Itself Free
« Last post by TimothyEllis on October 22, 2023, 01:40:49 AM »
As an aside, I just saw an article announcing that Best Buy was going to stop shelving DVDs and CDs--this used to be their bread and butter. This is not good for books because I believe the type of customer that browses a physical store for DVDs also will check out books. So Best Buy is all but giving up with physical stores and library-like commodities.

Like books, it's too easy to order them online.

Currently, I can order DVD's on release day, and have them delivered 90 minutes later by Uber.

The irony is these are coming from the stores in the malls, but there are alternatives which are pure online now. Just the freight is slower.
97
Book Talk [Public] / Re: Barnes & Noble Sets Itself Free
« Last post by alhawke on October 22, 2023, 01:36:30 AM »
B. Daltons. I haven't heard of that one in a while. Just B&N's and used book stores around me.

The problem with brick and mortar stores, and we've talked of this before, is they devote rows and rows to the same author. I think this is not only for brand recognition but also for contractural reasons. One would think that grabbing bestselling books from a wide array of authors might provide more variety and sell better?? That's the thing with B&N. Unless you browse the romance section (which has some variety) you're stuck with only a handful of authors represented.

As an aside, I just saw an article announcing that Best Buy was going to stop shelving DVDs and CDs--this used to be their bread and butter. This is not good for books because I believe the type of customer that browses a physical store for DVDs also will check out books. So Best Buy is all but giving up with physical stores and library-like commodities.
98
Book Talk [Public] / Re: Barnes & Noble Sets Itself Free
« Last post by LilyBLily on October 22, 2023, 12:46:29 AM »
The B. Dalton's where I worked part-time for a while closed years ago, and then the mall it was in finally closed this year after all the anchor stores departed. Now it is being torn down. They'll probably build stick condos on the property. Stick condos are mushrooming all over the country.

Where I live now, there's a Books-a-Million a mere 15 miles from me and a used bookstore a couple of miles beyond. But I truly do not want to bulk up my physical possessions. I'd rather read an ebook. I did chase down a few titles at a Friends of the Library bookstore a mere 90 miles from me several years ago, but it's far less expensive to buy a library card in other states yearly and use their ebook lending feature. The problem is that older trad pub books often do not have an ebook, or the library system has not purchased any backlist ebooks. Here in West Virginia, the libraries do not have a big budget, so the selection tends to be limited to exactly the kinds of books I have no interest in reading, the big bestsellers. 
99
Book Talk [Public] / Re: Barnes & Noble Sets Itself Free
« Last post by Bill Hiatt on October 21, 2023, 11:15:46 PM »
I know what you mean. But in a lot of places, LA being one of them, yeah, the suburbs are different from the central city, but traffic congestion tends to increase regardless. The last year before I retired, I was part-time, but I generally stayed late so as not to take work home. But when I did that, my 15-20 minute drive home became over an hour. So I started leaving as early as I could to beat what was otherwise insane traffic--and that was surface streets. Freeways would have been even worse.

After retirement, I found myself driving so little (mostly using Uber when I did travel) that I eventually gave up the car completely. Part of that was a response to not wanting to hassle the traffic, but part of it was a response to the comparative lack of bookstores to visit. That said, this conversation is making me want to go over to the last BN standing in the area and see what changes have been wrought. That's probably a better use of my time than mourning the ones that have closed.
100
Book Talk [Public] / Re: Barnes & Noble Sets Itself Free
« Last post by LilyBLily on October 21, 2023, 06:25:09 AM »
Indie bookstores move out when the rent gets too high as the neighborhood becomes fashionable. Happens everywhere. The arty types with no money draw the richer types who do have money and want to buy expensive stuff. Landlords raise all the rents and chase the arty ones away. The rich but uncreative types pretend to themselves that they are very cool and possibly even arty.

I don't know what a reasonable distance to a store is anymore. Living in the boondocks as I do, I just get in the car and point it in the direction of civilization. People who live in more urban-like but actually quite suburban settings tend to get fussy about how far they have to travel to get to a store. Five miles! Oh, lordy!
Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10