Recent Posts

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Are you sure you can’t create a .mobi with kindle create? It does on my computer, although I do remember it being a little convoluted to find. Admittedly I might not have downloaded the last eat version. That said, the file isn’t the same as the final ebook file. The margins are wrong and bug me every time. I only use it for proofreading though.

Instructions?

I couldn't find how.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by Rinelle on Today at 04:36:25 PM »
I pay about $40 a month for ‘extras’ care, which includes dentists, glasses, and non-subsidised prescriptions. Get free doctors and hospital care.

I love living in Australia!
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Are you sure you can’t create a .mobi with kindle create? It does on my computer, although I do remember it being a little convoluted to find. Admittedly I might not have downloaded the last eat version. That said, the file isn’t the same as the final ebook file. The margins are wrong and bug me every time. I only use it for proofreading though.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by R H Auslander on Today at 03:41:55 PM »
Health care for both of us is free and good. At least in this berg medicine costs are regulated and pharmacies are checked almost weekly for price and service. We don't have ambulance chasing lawyers here so 'optional' health care and services and medicine costs are low. I'm on 3 different heart meds (don't get your hopes up, I'll be around for a whlie yet) and the monthly cost is roughly ten bucks. In this berg all meds are manufactured in Russian Federation or Germany, nothing else is allowed. While the health care is free, depending on your financial status the medicines are not, but the threshold for City Government to pick up the costs is low.

Care in this berg is quite good, and doctors, both for us two legs and the dogs, do make home visits. Hospital #4 is but five minutes from our house if needed, and I have some old wounds that do from time to time kick up, witness four weeks ago when a left over tiny piece of metal in my left arm seems to have waited 6 years before deciding to start an infection. It was less than three hours from the time of 'well, mayhap I should see the sawbones about this glowing red hot arm' to the good Tovarich Doktor cutting in to the problem.

However, when one gets off the beaten path, care availability can drop a bit.
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When I log into my Author Central account to check my latest reviews, it only shows two pages, and the most recent one is from 2017. At first, if I clicked the "next" button, the true second page would show up, with sixty some other pages… but then I tried the other sorting options, and it went back. Also, it's not showing all of my reviews up to 2017: only a few of them.

Amazon recently published a research paper that suggests some of the changes they're planning to roll out (possibly including product categorization) may involve customer reviews. Also, this paper from August 2019 suggests that they're trying to fix the broken review system.

Could this glitch portend an algorithm change to the review system, or is author central only broken for me?

It's all broken. The editors are hot and miss and right now the Paperback blurb editor doesn't post to the sales page at all. Also, the reviews system is a joke. Realy readers can't post reviews becasue they haven't spent enough at Amazon, but the cheats can post fake reviews all day. I have six books for sale and have bought quite a few and still can't post reviews with the new rules.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by B.L. Alley on Today at 03:35:17 PM »
And yet, I got disability from SS on my first try, without the aid of a lawyer. Went onto the SS website, looked up the procedure and started. It took four or five months before they sent me a letter saying I was scheduled for a doctor's visit and when I went in for that visit, he was understanding and helpful. He filed his report and it took another couple of months or so before I got a letter from SS saying I had been approved and would start receiving the payments starting the next month. They also said I would receive a check for the amount of the disability payments going back to the date I applied. which worked out to about six months of payments. So it can be done without a lawyer. You just have to know how to follow directions and be patient.

Anyway, that was about four years ago and I've been able to see doctors on a regular basis and they put me on Medicare a couple of years ago. Oh, and I turn 62 next month, so you don't have to wait until you're 65 to get these benefits.

You mean all I had to do was follow directions and I would have received benefits? To think I wasted an entire year by filling out the forms in Pig Latin and drawing obscene stick figures in the margins, then showing up to interviews wearing a tutu and pink combat boots.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by Luke Everhart on Today at 03:24:47 PM »
The ACA is a flawed system, certainly, but health care in America was a horrible mess long before it came about, and in certain states it has improved things.

Health care is not a mess in the US. It's just expensive, sometimes a lot more expensive than it should be.

Well, I mean, Americans pay far more per capita than any other developed country for far less comprehensive coverage and worse results. That's because we prioritize industry profits over the actual well being of those that use the system. That seems like a mess in my book

It's a mess, yes. But the other side of the equation is that the US and its corporations are also responsible for 95% of the world's research and development of new pharmaceuticals and new medical technologies every year, an average that has been the case for decades. And industry profits, however excessive, are less of a burden on consumer costs than the absurdly monumental cost imposed by the FDA in the world's longest, most expensive drug approval process.
Cost to develop a new drug through the FDA approval process is estimated at an average of $2.6 billion per a report by the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development and published in the Journal of Health Economics and that cost is assumed despite an actual approval rate of only 12% after entering clinical development (same study).
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by Alec Hutson on Today at 03:11:10 PM »
The ACA is a flawed system, certainly, but health care in America was a horrible mess long before it came about, and in certain states it has improved things.

Health care is not a mess in the US. It's just expensive, sometimes a lot more expensive than it should be.

Well, I mean, Americans pay far more per capita than any other developed country for far less comprehensive coverage and worse results. That's because we prioritize industry profits over the actual well being of those that use the system. That seems like a mess in my book

You can see some of the stats here:

https://www.pgpf.org/blog/2019/07/how-does-the-us-healthcare-system-compare-to-other-countries

"In 2018, the U.S. spent about $10,600 per person on healthcare — the highest healthcare costs per capita across the OECD. For comparison, Switzerland was the second highest-spending country with about $7,300 in healthcare costs per capita, while the average for wealthy OECD countries, excluding the United States, was only $5,300 per person. Such comparisons indicate that the U.S. spends a disproportionate amount on healthcare."

...

"There are many possible factors for why healthcare prices in the U.S. are higher than other countries, ranging from the consolidation of hospitals — leading to a lack of competition — to the inefficiencies and administrative waste that derive from the complexity of the U.S. healthcare system. In fact, the U.S. spends over $800 per person on administrative costs — nearly five times more than the average of other wealthy countries and significantly more than we spend on preventive or long-term healthcare."

...

"Prices, therefore, appear to be the main driver of the cost difference between the U.S. and other wealthy countries. In fact, prices in the U.S. tend to be higher regardless of utilization rates."

...

"America’s health outcomes are not any better than those in other developed countries. The U.S. actually performs worse in some common health metrics like life expectancy, infant mortality, and unmanaged diabetes."
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by Luke Everhart on Today at 03:05:02 PM »
I assume the question is actually for what self-employed authors are paying? That's not me but...

Currently mine is covered by an employer.
But if it wasn't, because I'm a single guy who is extremely healthy with no medical issues and so therefore shoulders a disproportionate share of the cost of those who actually use healthcare, under the ACA an 80/20 co-pay with a $5000 annual deductible would cost me $1100 per month?! So... I'd be $18200 in the hole in one year to get 80% of costs covered. The fork?!?!
The ACA is a redistribution of costs that subverts the actuarial model insurance is based on, not an actual cost reduction.

Were I to go self-employed I'd join one of the Christian cost-sharing programs like Medi-Share because conventional insurance has been destroyed in the US except for those in the high risk pool.

The Slack self-published writing group I'm a part of talks a lot about health care, and I think the cost you're talking about would be a little high based on what they say unless you're in a state where the ACA has been horribly mismanaged (which happens, sometimes intentionally). One of them is a 29 year old healthy male in MA and he pays something like 600 a month. ...

Massachusetts vs Texas I guess. I got the figure from the healthcare.gov 'marketplace by state' section as a hypothetical.

If the ACA had been more than political graft in the service of the insurance industry, ensuring that virtually every conceivable service had to be covered in even the minimum insurance plan (bronze plans under ACA are more comprehensive than 80ish% of all private plans that existed pre-ACA), then more demo-appropriate, limited options would be available which would dramatically reduce cost to many. But, again, it's a redistribution of both risk and cost that contravenes the basic actuarial risk model of insurance. Obgyn, psych care, etc shouldn't be mandatory in plans sold to demos not in need, or even capable of being in need, of those services.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by dgcasey on Today at 03:02:00 PM »
The ACA is a flawed system, certainly, but health care in America was a horrible mess long before it came about, and in certain states it has improved things.

Health care is not a mess in the US. It's just expensive, sometimes a lot more expensive than it should be.
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