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31
Three bananas a day is a bit much but bananas, in moderation, are still healthy.

"For most people with diabetes, fruits (including bananas) are a healthy choice. One exception to this is if you're following a low-carb diet to control your diabetes. Even a small banana contains around 22 grams of carbs, which may be too much for your diet plan."

I have never heard that Consumption of sugar in and of itself, can cause diabetes.

"Consuming sugar is not a direct risk factor for type 2 diabetes, although it can have indirect effects, such as weight gain, that make the condition more likely to develop. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include: being overweight or having a large waist circumference."

Although my mother-in-law believed that if she ate a piece of hard candy a day, she would never develop diabetes. She didn't, so I guess it worked for her.

The men in my family all have type II diabetes. Most of them are on insulin, but the rest of them (including the women) control it with diet and medication.

I myself, eat a quarter or a third of a banana a day, depending how big the banana is. I got a banana slicer from Amazon that cuts it in 6-1/4 inch slices. I put six slices a day on my waffle with a smear of peanut butter. The peanut butter and waffle are worse for my diabetes then the banana is. I don't worry about it because I weigh less than 100 pounds. I take metformin with dinner which keeps my blood sugar level and my A1c is within normal limits.

When I was in the hospital and rehab, they did not give me any medication, but tested my sugar before every meal. The two or three times it went up over 160 I got a shot. Otherwise, the doctors and nurses were happy if I tested 120 to 130. They were unhappy when I dropped below 100 and made me eat.

When I got home, I tested my sugar before breakfast and it was up over 190 every day. I went back on Metformin but it didn't seem to help. Then I noticed my testing supplies were at least a year out of date. I spent $90 on a new machine and my levels dropped to normal.

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Do you guys not worry about eating high sugar fruits like bananas? My mother has high sugar levels and to prevent it getting to diabetes, she cut out sweets and high sugar fruits like bananas, mangoes, chikoos on her doctor’s recommendation. She eats the occasional biscuit or chocolate.

My father knew this but blithely continued for years to slice 3 bananas or chikoos into his morning oatmeal. On top of that, he would add a spoonful of sugar. Which pretty much negated the whole idea of the health value of oats.

And for years he was fine. I suspect because he loved to take long daily walks. I think the exercise kept his sugar levels down.

Then he started to get arthritis and painful knees that curtailed his walking. Some months before the lockdown the doc found he was on the verge of diabetes.

So he suddenly gave up all high sugar fruits and started to eat walnuts since that’s supposed to bring down sugar levels. Yeah, like that was going to miraculously reverse the diabetes. But the doc wanted him to try first before putting him on medication.

After the lockdown, he got another test done and found his levels were still high. You can’t abuse your body for years and then expect to reverse the damage in a few months.

So, learning from his example, I have given up bananas and chikoos. I won't give up mangoes since I love them too much, plus they’re only available 3 months of the year.

Google just told me:

“The English words for chiku are sapodilla, noseberry, and mudapples. In India, it is called chickoo and sapota among other names.”
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Well done, Maggie Ann!  :dog1:
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: 50+ words a day...no matter what!
« Last post by Maggie Ann on July 28, 2020, 10:51:14 AM »
405 words last night and a bit of revising.

I've been spending my time relearning how to write in cursive and how to type. It's coming along.
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1101 words.  Nice to get some writing done!  :smilie_zauber:
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: The Garden Thread that two people wanted
« Last post by Vijaya on July 28, 2020, 02:22:00 AM »
It's beautiful Jan.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: The Garden Thread that two people wanted
« Last post by LilyBLily on July 26, 2020, 05:46:43 AM »
That palm is fantastic! Beautiful.

We discovered another wild version of an evening primrose. And we got lucky and finally there was significant rain. Many flowers look quite singed, however.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: The Garden Thread that two people wanted
« Last post by notthatamanda on July 26, 2020, 03:00:05 AM »
Wow, I feel special for getting to see that. Thanks for sharing Jan.

Garden - ugh. A friend told me a potato sprouted in her vegetable drawer and she planted it a month ago and has been harvesting potatoes left and right. We are headed into another heat wave, 100 degrees predicted on Monday, but the rain barrels are full for now. Only one of my roses rebloomed, with only two flowers. I need to get some fertilizer down for the rain at the end of next week hopefully. If they blew the forecast and we don't get rain, well, veggie garden is going to be in trouble.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: 50+ words a day...no matter what!
« Last post by notthatamanda on July 26, 2020, 02:54:56 AM »
1799.  And I did contact the cover artist. So I guess I will eventually publish it.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: The Garden Thread that two people wanted
« Last post by Jan Hurst-Nicholson on July 26, 2020, 01:42:20 AM »
Thought you might like to see my neighbour's pony tail palm (sometimes called an elephant's foot palm). It only flowers every 10 - 20 years.

From the www.
You can grow ponytail palm in the ground or in very large pots. In either case, given sufficient patience, you may be lucky enough to see it flower. Flowering on a ponytail palm does not occur the first year you purchase the small plant nor is it likely to during the next decade. Before the plant flowers, it increases significantly in size and girth. The plant’s palm-like trunk sometimes grows to 18 feet (5.5 m.) high and widens to 6 feet (2 m.) in diameter. But size alone does not trigger first flowering on a ponytail palm. Experts believe that a combination of factors, including weather, can be instrumental in causing initial ponytail palm flowering. Once the plant blooms, it will flower every summer.

Not sure about it flowering every summer  :icon_rolleyes:
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