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As far as revenue goes, KU is obviously better for longer books. My novellas earn pennies in KU compared to what I earn for a full sale. In the next couple of weeks, I plan to crunch the data and write up a more detailed analysis on this KU experiment for my 2021 business plan.

It's also very genre dependent. From what I have heard, space opera is very much a KU genre.

Last point first, yes. Space Opera is a KU genre. So is LitRPG and GameLit.

About sales verses reads though, while KU does cannibalize sales, you can tap into a whole KU section of people who were never going to buy your book anyway. With these people, KU is a bonus income you were not getting with just sales alone.

The calculation is if the reduction in sales income is offset by the increase in read income.

And I'm using income deliberately. The people who use KU to binge read will pick up on whatever book is visible, read it, like it, then binge on your entire catalogue. This happens in sales, but not as often because of the high cost of buying.

It's the binge readers using KU you need to reach. Once you do, KU works.

On a book by book basis, the stats might say KU is not working. But on a catalogue level, the stats may be totally different. The only book I pay any individual attention to is the current one. Otherwise it's the daily totals which I track.
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I used to be all wide, but I've been experimenting with KU for one of my older series (space opera, novella length). I also just released a short story in KU, and plan to use my free days this week.

It seems that taking a backlist book out from the other retailers in order to enroll in KU is a suboptimal strategy. I suspect that the visibility boost that KU gives a book isn't sufficient unless coupled with other things, either ads or the extra visibility you get before the 30-day and 90-day cliffs.

As far as revenue goes, KU is obviously better for longer books. My novellas earn pennies in KU compared to what I earn for a full sale. In the next couple of weeks, I plan to crunch the data and write up a more detailed analysis on this KU experiment for my 2021 business plan.

It's also very genre dependent. From what I have heard, space opera is very much a KU genre.
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Marketing Loft [Public] / Re: Is anyone else splitting books between wide and KU?
« Last post by JRTomlin on March 31, 2020, 01:58:01 PM »
Timothy, I've been around the block a few times. Of course, I promoted them. 

In my experience, historical fiction does not do that well in KU, and because my novels are generally priced at $4.99 when I do (I should say 'did'. I was in KU for a year before I pulled everything out about a year ago) get reads I lose too much money on them. I was experimenting to see if historical mysteries might be an exception, especially since they are the lowest priced novels I have. As far as I can tell, the answer is no.

ETA: Having lowered my prices to $2.99 as a gesture in the health crisis is hurting me financially. *sigh* I hate having novels at that price but I'm going to leave them there for another week or so giving people a chance to pick up some cheap reads while stuck at home many with a severely reduced income.
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Same here. I put my historical mystery series back in KU and it is a failed experiment. I'll take it out as soon as the term ends.

KU isn't an automatic boost.

Unless you have a release or promo going on to give the books visibility, just putting them in KU isn't going to generate reads.

It works for me because I'm releasing regularly, and the whole back catalogue is in KU.

A lot of my current income is series 1 KU reads, because series 5 book 1 referenced events at the end of that series. So even 5 year old books in KU are still getting good reads. And those finding series 5, are going back and reading almost everything I've written.

KU is not a drop box to generate income. It never was. You have to have a strategy to keep visibility.
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Marketing Loft [Public] / Re: Is anyone else splitting books between wide and KU?
« Last post by JRTomlin on March 31, 2020, 12:55:23 PM »
I have one series in KU and the rest are wide. But the KU thing was a failed experiment and I'll be going back to wide after my KU series is finished. I just want to give the KU readers a fair chance to finish the series before I duck back out.
Same here. I put my historical mystery series back in KU and it is a failed experiment. I'll take it out as soon as the term ends.
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I'm all in KU.

And it continues to be about 65% of my income.

For me, wide was the total failure.
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What are Amazon doing now? [Public] / Re: New Audible changes with Promo codes
« Last post by Denise on March 31, 2020, 10:49:42 AM »
Worth noting that extra codes can be requested after 10 of your initial codes have been redeemed and 100 qualified sales of your file catalogue. Which suggests that if you already have a total of 100 sales from previous books that's a moot condition.
For mine, the lack of a royalty payment puts a big dent in the appeal of going exclusive and thus getting codes. But there's not a hell of a lot of other promotional options.

100 qualified sales of your file catalogue is easy peasy, I mean... You don't have to be a big seller.  If it's true, I think it's fine. New audiobook producers will suffer for the first titles, but they'll soon be fine.

I was thinking they wanted 100 qualified sales from an audiobook before giving more codes. If you consider that the codes are for early reviews, which is usually used right after launch, most indies wouldn't be able to benefit from more than 25 codes until it wasn't very useful or relevant anymore.

Edit: just confirmed that I can get more than 25 codes for each market. Yay!

To your second point, I still think that it's better to get the Audible codes because Audible is still the biggest store, and you want your reviews to show up there. Without going exclusive and getting the codes, you'll have fewer reviews on Audible. Then again, I'm not so sure how much reviews influence buyers.
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Worth noting that extra codes can be requested after 10 of your initial codes have been redeemed and 100 qualified sales of your file catalogue. Which suggests that if you already have a total of 100 sales from previous books that's a moot condition.
For mine, the lack of a royalty payment puts a big dent in the appeal of going exclusive and thus getting codes. But there's not a hell of a lot of other promotional options.
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Yep, I started that way and have been thinking of taking some books out of KU but haven't yet. I have an epic fantasy series wide, and an epic fantasy series with KU + an Urban Fantasy there too.

The longer books tended to be in KU at first, now I've included a few shorter ones.

(Over the years, the wide has equally or overtaken most of the Amazon-only titles.)
30
For example, I can't see a good explanation for why infection rates and death rates are higher in Italy than in adjacent countries. If we don't know what causes accelerated contagion, how do we really know that any model will be accurate.

Cultural issues.

As I've said before, Italians are kissers and huggers. They greet people by kissing them on both cheeks. That's an immediate transfer of body fluids, where the virus is ejected from the body through the mouth. Hugging places the mouth alongside the neck, and transmission could be through the ears.


Another bit of food for thought:


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