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Quote
Cover image
The title, subtitle, author name, and series information on your cover should match the corresponding metadata fields. Covers that may be misleading because they closely resemble another book's layout, color scheme, fonts and/or images aren't allowed.
https://kdp.amazon.com/en_US/help/topic/G201097560

I don't remember the emphasized (mine) portion, but I am not 100% sure.

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Okay, so I think there's a misunderstanding about how KDP works.

Regardless if you upload a mobi or epub or word doc or whatever, Amazon converts it to its own version it distributes. The file you upload is not the exact same file downloaded from the sight. And the previewer definitely isn't showing you the same thing that others see on their devices.

Part of that final proof is to catch odd words, but also to catch problematic formatting that can't be seen on your own file or the previewer. The file we download from the dash is the file customers get. If I can't proof the same file a customer gets I can't be sure things will work right.

By removing the file download option from the dashboard, Amazon is making it impossible for anyone to see the file that will actually be distributed to customers.
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Marketing Loft [Public] / Re: Reader Magnet As Perma-free?
« Last post by Bill Hiatt on February 19, 2020, 08:29:28 AM »
Ultimately I would like to go wide. For now I need to grow my catalog and sticking to KDP just makes life simpler for now.

Thanks for your comment. It always feels good to know I'm not the only one struggling with these kind of problems.
Ah, far from the only one! Even people with much more experience than you and I have struggle sometimes because conditions change so fast.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by Bill Hiatt on February 19, 2020, 08:27:28 AM »
Fun facts about healthcare:

US is not #1 in patient satisfaction https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/quality/where-does-the-us-rank-internationally-in-patient-satisfaction.html
Sweden 92.37%
Finland 91.92%
Norway 90.75%
US  89.33%

I won't deny that the US actually has the best standard of care--for those who can afford it. That's why foreign heads of state so often end up here. But access to medical care is uneven at best. The three countries that beat us in satisfaction also have socialized medicine. Hmm...

Healthcare in the US is also far more expensive than in comparable countries. https://www.healthsystemtracker.org/chart-collection/health-spending-u-s-compare-countries/#item-average-wealthy-countries-spend-half-much-per-person-health-u-s-spends
US average cost per capita is $10,224. Average for economically comparable countries is $5,280. Also, US costs are growing faster than those in other countries.

So, let's see, we provide more expensive care at a lower rate of patient satisfaction than some of our single-payer healthcare rivals. Explain to me again why our system is so wonderful?

That said, Masked Scrivener has a point about being forced to have medical insurance, and I can also see the argument for people happy with their current health care. That's why I'm more of an advocate for Medicare for everyone who wants it rather than Medicare for all, at least in the short-term. Two things to keep in mind, though. First, people can experience sudden changes in health status that may make them regret not having insurance. I've seen this happen. Second, the people who opt not to be insured will tend to be the healthy ones (duh!) which makes insurance costs proportionately higher for everybody else.

It's also worth noting, in response to someone's earlier comment about people being denied the prescribed treatment, that that is hardly unique to government-run system--but at least the government-run variety is not motivated by profit. Private insurance companies have been notorious for that for years and will continue to be. For example, a friend of mine was diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma. That's an extremely rare condition for which there is only one treatment that produces results. Ordinary chemo doesn't do a thing. Initial insurance company response: denied on the basis the process was experimental. (It's been used for years, and its effectiveness is supported by research.) My friend eventually won on appeal, but it took months, and literally whole working days for him and his wife to pour through medical journals for more information, something a lot of people couldn't have done. He's still with us, but a lot of people caught in that trap could have ended up dead.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by Bill Hiatt on February 19, 2020, 08:06:27 AM »
What if the US negotiated prices with the pharmaceutical companies? First, we'd get cheaper drugs. Second, globally, drug manufacturing would become less profitable. Then, R&D budgets would fall.

I think it actually works the other way around. Broadly speaking, earning loads off of ten products reduces the incentive (urgency) to create more products. When those ten products begin earning less, there's an incentive to create more products to restore revenue/profits, despite their development costs.
I'm not an expert, but if the government negotiates the price, the incentive to create more products may not be there, because the profit may not be there. Not like in the current environment.

Any way you slice it though, it would be an interesting experiment if the US would start negotiating drug prices.
Your argument is sound, but there is one way to short-circuit that connection between research funds and profit margins--government-financed research.

Big Pharma can do as it pleases in part because it doesn't face as much outside competition. If it chooses not to research treatments for a particular medical problem, right now philanthropic efforts aren't able to fill the gap. But if Big Pharma knew that the government would start developing drugs and potentially make them available for a very low cost? Big Pharma would race to develop those drugs first, even if their profit margin was lower.

Big Pharma has long been able to set its own priorities, often with detrimental results. For instance, in the beginning, BP spent more of its research funds on cures. Gradually, the emphasis shifted more and more to treatment. It's not that treatment isn't important, but the reason for the shift was that treatment is more profitable than cure. Why cure diabetes when you can keep selling people insulin and other drugs? The long-term profits are far greater.

But if someone else appeared to be working toward a cure? I bet Big Pharma would come up with one in record time to salvage what it could.
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by Bill Hiatt on February 19, 2020, 07:54:42 AM »
Are they as angst at corporations making profit from food production? Food is an even more basic human need.

That was one of the things Crowder got on about in his little rant. He showed the healthcare sector brought in $100 billion in profits in 2018. Then he showed that Apple had brought in profits to equal almost 60% of that. Just one tech company brought in over half what the entire healthcare sector brought in. Where's the outrage over Apple's overpriced smartphones?
Because your life is unlikely to depend on possessing an Apple smartphone. Your life might depend on the quality of healthcare you can receive.
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My own experience with BB ads is that a lot of text just doesn't work well. The simpler I make mine, generally the better they work.  (although some just don't anyway)

I ran one as a run-up to a BB Free Promotion in the week after I already had it free.

It got this which was not fantastic but not terrible either: CPM $10.81   CPC $0.41   Cost $85.09 Impressions 7,865 Clicks 206   CtR 2.62%



I tested this one first thinking maybe a little text wouldn't hurt and got a CTR of 1.21% and canceled it. *sigh*



What works for me seems to be the cover and FREE in a really big font.  :icon_rofl: To hell with pretty.

ETA: For me the comprables for targetting are the hard part. There just aren't many HF authors with a big following on BB except trade authors like Bernard Cornwell and those are a waste of money. Testing comparables is an absolute necessity on BB.
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Quill and Feather Pub [Public] / Re: Questions for Beta Readers
« Last post by alhawke on February 19, 2020, 07:01:14 AM »
I don't provide my beta readers with any guides, but, I'm not a guide/outline kinda writer. I think I'm compulsive enough as is.

Invariably, I find my beta readers agree on the same problems. And if they miss them, my editors find them.
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Have you tried Kindle Previewer?
https://kdp.amazon.com/en_US/help/topic/G202131170
You can use it to create a mobi
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Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by dgcasey on February 19, 2020, 06:13:06 AM »
Are they as angst at corporations making profit from food production? Food is an even more basic human need.

That was one of the things Crowder got on about in his little rant. He showed the healthcare sector brought in $100 billion in profits in 2018. Then he showed that Apple had brought in profits to equal almost 60% of that. Just one tech company brought in over half what the entire healthcare sector brought in. Where's the outrage over Apple's overpriced smartphones?
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