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91
Marketing Loft [Public] / Re: Reader Magnet As Perma-free?
« Last post by The Masked Scrivener on February 19, 2020, 05:46:10 AM »
Ultimately I would like to go wide. For now I need to grow my catalog and sticking to KDP just makes life simpler for now.

Thanks for your comment. It always feels good to know I'm not the only one struggling with these kind of problems.
92
Quill and Feather Pub [Public] / Re: Questions for Beta Readers
« Last post by Vidya on February 19, 2020, 05:36:59 AM »
I usually tell my betas:

I would appreciate it if you could tell me:

1. are there any points where you found it too slow or repetitive? If so, where?

2. are there any words, phrases, sentences, paragraphs that are repetitive?

3. Was anything confusing or unclear?

4. I don't live in the US. Is there anything in the novel that Americans or westerners in general would find politically incorrect or offensive, any words or phrasings? or anything that might be inaccurate or sound awkward regarding American words and phrasings.
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Marketing Loft [Public] / Re: Reader Magnet As Perma-free?
« Last post by Bill Hiatt on February 19, 2020, 05:21:25 AM »
Some people drift from store to store, but it's my impression most stick with one. The non-Amazon to Amazon shift is a particularly tough one because Amazon uses an entirely different format. Personally, I like having all my books in the same format and easily available on one device.

For that reason, if I were you, I wouldn't waste my time making the reader magnet permafree unless you eventually plan to have other books wide.

Like you, I'm happy with KU, but I do have my reader magnets up wide (including Amazon), and I have one series wide as well. However, that series hasn't prospered, so I can't say it was a great strategy for me. However, there is the argument that it's nice to have a presence outside Amazon, and certainly some people have made it work.
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Marketing Loft [Public] / Reader Magnet As Perma-free?
« Last post by The Masked Scrivener on February 19, 2020, 04:56:41 AM »
I have a series on KPD Select and I'm happy with KU at this point in my career. I also have a reader magnet that I give away in return for collecting email addresses.

My question is does it make any sense to release that reader magnet on other store fronts as a perma-free?

I understand I won't get email addresses from those "purchases" but it could help me reach audiences outside Amazon. Would those audiences be willing to come to Amazon for my other books?

Thank you in advance for any input.
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Quill and Feather Pub [Public] / Re: Questions for Beta Readers
« Last post by Lynn on February 19, 2020, 04:10:56 AM »
Too much of their advice is personal likes and dislikes and could make you doubt things that you'll then try to change and screw up your book. That's why. :D

But some people thrive on that kind of collaborative story creation so I can't say it won't help you, only that I've never found it helpful for me. :)
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Quill and Feather Pub [Public] / Re: Questions for Beta Readers
« Last post by idontknowyet on February 19, 2020, 04:00:00 AM »
Im open to all advice.

Why skip beta's all together? These would be actual readers in the genre not editor beta.
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Quill and Feather Pub [Public] / Re: Questions for Beta Readers
« Last post by Lynn on February 19, 2020, 03:43:23 AM »
Be careful of leading questions. You'll put ideas in people's heads that weren't there to start with, and they'll give you answers they think will help you and all it'll do is confuse the issue.

Better to ask something vague. "Did anything stand out to you when you read this book, good or bad?" and let it go at that.

And if you can handle it, skip the beta reading altogether. ;D But I assume since you've asked the question, that's unhelpful advice. Sorry! :D
98
Quill and Feather Pub [Public] / Questions for Beta Readers
« Last post by idontknowyet on February 19, 2020, 03:38:55 AM »
I don't remember if this topic has been talked about recently, but here goes...

I've read when sending out ARC to beta readers it tends to be more effective when you provide them with a list of questions. What do you ask?

These are the ones I've been thinking of.

Did the book feel too long, too short or just right? (Addressing pacing)
What did you like about the Main Character? What did you dislike? (Characterization)
What was your favorite part of the story? What was your least? (This can address many things but I would hope for plot holes or slow sections of the book)
Did you notice any big oopsies… wrong eye or hair color, wrong place wrong time, any over used words or phrases, etc.
How did you feel when you finished reading the book? (Overall storyline)
At any point did you want to put the book down? If so where? (Soggy Middles)



99
Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by DrewMcGunn on February 19, 2020, 03:01:13 AM »
What if the US negotiated prices with the pharmaceutical companies? First, we'd get cheaper drugs. Second, globally, drug manufacturing would become less profitable. Then, R&D budgets would fall.

I think it actually works the other way around. Broadly speaking, earning loads off of ten products reduces the incentive (urgency) to create more products. When those ten products begin earning less, there's an incentive to create more products to restore revenue/profits, despite their development costs.
I'm not an expert, but if the government negotiates the price, the incentive to create more products may not be there, because the profit may not be there. Not like in the current environment.

Any way you slice it though, it would be an interesting experiment if the US would start negotiating drug prices.
100
Bar & Grill [Public] / Re: What Do You Pay For Health Care?
« Last post by Shoe on February 19, 2020, 02:57:11 AM »

Except the US has learned from other countries and that is why we don't want a government monopoly of our health care services.

I doubt this is true. What country with universal healthcare would they point to as an example? Can you name one?

Quote
The real problem with the US health care system is over insurance. Americans go to doctors for every little thing when they are insured for it. This causes the cost of insurance to go up.

There are several layers there but the truth lies elsewhere--if everyone was insured and got the care they needed when they needed it, the costs of healthcare would go down dramatically.
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