Author Topic: Is this what morning sickness is like? How does any woman go through it?  (Read 507 times)

Vidya

I got severe food poisoning and was in bed all of yesterday, barely able to even sit up. I couldn’t keep down even a glass of water.

A strong anti-nausea tablet eventually stopped the vomiting, but I was still too weak to get out of bed.

One day of that was bad enough. I can imagine how any woman can go through that day after day. But maybe the  anti-nausea tablets cure  morning sickness? But if the cure was so easy, why would women still complain about it?
 

Maggie Ann

I got severe food poisoning and was in bed all of yesterday, barely able to even sit up. I couldn’t keep down even a glass of water.

A strong anti-nausea tablet eventually stopped the vomiting, but I was still too weak to get out of bed.

One day of that was bad enough. I can imagine how any woman can go through that day after day. But maybe the  anti-nausea tablets cure  morning sickness? But if the cure was so easy, why would women still complain about it?

It's been a long time, but I can tell you that my morning sickness for both pregnancies lasted 24/7 for months. Probably if I could have thrown up in the morning, it wouldn't have gone on all day and night. And I didn't get weak from it so no excuse to stay in bed. Besides, I had to go to work. It's different for everyone.

I don't know if they have meds for it now, but pregnancy really restricts what you can take. It's all bad for the baby.

We just do what we've got to do and get through it.
           
 

Captain Cranky

I had morning sickness throughout my entire pregnancy and for two weeks after I gave birth, and it wasn't restricted to mornings unfortunately  :shrug It wasn't pleasant, I had sciatica and no car and was probably doing way too much walking (actually at the end I was ten days overdue so it was more like waddling lol) but life didn't stop because I was pregnant. You just get things done because you have to. I'm not sure if anti-nausea medications would have been a possibility but it would have meant taking them everyday so maybe not. They've worked great when I've had bad migraines though.

I'm very sorry you're unwell, try to take it easy and get well soon  :heart:
Just keep your head down and keep on swinging.
 

LilyBLily

Feel better soon!

There are varying degrees of morning sickness. I've known someone who felt nauseated for months at a time and occasionally had to be hospitalized for dehydration. There was some vomiting, but mostly the feeling was the nausea and the fear of vomiting yet again. It's not like food poisoning, but the aftermath of throwing up probably is the same for everyone who throws up.

 

Ampersand56

My first few months I sipped sugar free ginger beer pretty much all day. Blue Sky brand was my favorite for settling my stomach enough that I could eat. Congrats! I hope the nausea gets better!
 

cecilia_writer

I was very lucky only to get some nausea first thing in the morning at the start of both my pregnancies - I went right off coffee both times. Some people are very sick throughout, but I don't think that's exactly the norm.
Hope you are on the mend now, anyway.
Cecilia Peartree - Woman of Mystery
 

notthatamanda

My sister's sister in law was sick so much during the first trimester she was losing weight like crazy and they had to do something.

 I just felt tired and vaguely nauseous for the whole time.  When I would eat I would get to feel okay for about 5 minutes.  So I ate, way too much.  It sucks, but you keep your eye on the prize.  Honestly though, for me, it never felt like I was growing a baby, it felt like being trapped in a Stanley Kubrick movie and once you got to the end, they'd give you a baby.  I know a couple of women who liked being pregnant, I was not one of them.
 

Ros

Thalidomide was a morning sickness drug. You have to be really careful what you take in the first trimester, when the foetus is at its most vulnerable, so anti-nausea drugs are out of the question for most women.

I had fairly mild morning sickness; mainly it meant I avoided coffee and fried foods. But everyone has it differently.

I hope you get better soon.

Ros Jackson | author website | blog | twitter | goodreads
 

LilyBLily

Thalidomide was a morning sickness drug. You have to be really careful what you take in the first trimester, when the foetus is at its most vulnerable, so anti-nausea drugs are out of the question for most women.

I had fairly mild morning sickness; mainly it meant I avoided coffee and fried foods. But everyone has it differently.

I hope you get better soon.

My mother was given a prescription for nausea but she decided to not take it. She toughed out the nausea instead. Later, when DES was announced as an issue for a generation of women, giving them an increased risk of a rare cancer, she was glad she hadn't. So was I.
 

Paranormal Kitty

I got cyclosporiasis a few years ago and everyone at work spread rumors about me being pregnant because I was throwing up all day. I had it for three weeks before I finally found out what it was after there was a big cilantro recall. It's a parasite so apparently its life cycle just keeps going and going. I was starting to think I had cancer or something terrible. Cured by a $4 antibiotic.
 

notthatamanda

I was starting to think I had cancer or something terrible. Cured by a $4 antibiotic.

Where do you live that a prescription is $4?
 

Paranormal Kitty

Where do you live that a prescription is $4?

One of the lowest COL places in the US, but SMZ-TMP (generic for bactrum) is $4 at every Walmart pharmacy I think.
 

notthatamanda

One of the lowest COL places in the US, but SMZ-TMP (generic for bactrum) is $4 at every Walmart pharmacy I think.

Man I really need to ditch CVS.   Thanks.
 

bookworm

My baby is 14 months old and I had terrible morning sickness. The doctor offered me a prescription but it wasn't covered by insurance and cost a few dollars a day. No way could I afford that. There was a different drug (zofran) that was covered by insurance but it has possible side effects for the baby so the doctor recommended not to take it. I was absolutely miserable. I can't imagine it's the same as food poisoning though - I've never been through that but I always assumed that it would involve stomach pains as well. Anyways I hope you feel better.
 

Vidya

Thanks, everyone. I felt sick for some days but have got back to feeling human.

Bookworm, you say:

“My baby is 14 months old and I had terrible morning sickness. The doctor offered me a prescription but it wasn't covered by insurance and cost a few dollars a day.”

so there IS a safe drug that works? Whats the name?
 

LilyBLily

Thanks, everyone. I felt sick for some days but have got back to feeling human.

Bookworm, you say:

“My baby is 14 months old and I had terrible morning sickness. The doctor offered me a prescription but it wasn't covered by insurance and cost a few dollars a day.”

so there IS a safe drug that works? Whats the name?

I would say that no drug is safe, no matter what the doctors think now. Remember, they don't actually do the testing and research; they rely on the sales pitches from the unscrupulous pharma people. Oxycontin is safe! Fentanyl is safe! And on and on and on--until sad experience by the public proves otherwise.
 
The following users thanked this post: HSh

quinning

I was so sick with my first pregnancy that I was losing weight rapidly. The doctor put me on Phenergan. It made me so sleepy I had to nap every day in my bosses office so I could work the afternoon. But! I was able to eat and keep food down. For the record, she was born healthy and remains so 19 years later.
 

She-la-te-da

When you're pregnant, there really isn't any drug that's safe for anything. It all has risks.

With my first, I was so sick and I was given an anti-morning sickness drug. By the time the second one rolled around, I'd heard there were issues with that drug, and refused to take anything. I ate crackers before I got up, sipped ginger ale, restricted foods that seemed to make it worse. I made it through. With number three, I had such a bad sinus infection I didn't have to think about morning sickness. I was given a mile medication to cure the infection, something so mild even newborns were given it, and threw it up shortly after taking it. I just quit. I hate throwing up, and it was violent vomiting. Urgh.

Not everyone has morning sickness, and sometimes it's very mild. We get through it because in the end we'll have a baby and it's worth going through anything for that. All three of my pregnancies had issues (two breach babies, possibly the first being breach also, though each time the baby either turned or was turned), labor was long and hard, but I wouldn't change a thing.
I write various flavors of speculative fiction. This is my main pen name.

 

Vijaya

Not everyone has morning sickness, and sometimes it's very mild. We get through it because in the end we'll have a baby and it's worth going through anything for that.

This.

I had mild nausea with #1, lots of food aversions with #2--we had a lovely garden and I couldn't stand even the lettuce, lol. It's the birth that was hard--both were big babies--and had to be delivered via Cesarean. I wish now that we hadn't stopped having babies and stuck to our natural cycle because they're the most amazing people I know :heart:

Author of over 60 books and 60 magazine pieces, primarily for children
Vijaya Bodach | Personal Blog | Bodach Books
 

bookworm

Thanks, everyone. I felt sick for some days but have got back to feeling human.

Bookworm, you say:

“My baby is 14 months old and I had terrible morning sickness. The doctor offered me a prescription but it wasn't covered by insurance and cost a few dollars a day.”

so there IS a safe drug that works? Whats the name?
It's Diclegis. The doctor claimed it's completely safe to use.
 
The following users thanked this post: Vidya

bookworm

When you're pregnant, there really isn't any drug that's safe for anything. It all has risks.
Supposedly Diclegis is safe.
 

Kate Elizabeth

I was sick morning and night with both of my pregnancies, although with my second, I was sick past the fifth month. That was 20+ years ago. I was put on Phenergan, but all it did was make me sleepy besides feeling sick. I still worked, threw up in the office bathroom, sometimes went home if it wouldn't stop.

Now my daughter is pregnant. She couldn't keep anything down for a couple of weeks and ended up being hospitalized. She lost 7 pounds in a week, and she's barely a hundred soaking wet. Now she feels a lot better, and hopes that she's done with the nausea, etc.
 

Vidya

Reading all your stories makes me wonder at the propaganda that has told women that pregnancy is a completely natural and in fact a beautiful experience.

If any of you could have had the option to let a surrogate carry your baby, if cost wasn’t an issue, would you have taken it? Why or why not?

I suppose one major risk is the surrogate might ingest some harmful drug, like some drug meant to cure morning sickness.
 

Vijaya

Reading all your stories makes me wonder at the propaganda that has told women that pregnancy is a completely natural and in fact a beautiful experience.

If any of you could have had the option to let a surrogate carry your baby, if cost wasn’t an issue, would you have taken it? Why or why not?

I suppose one major risk is the surrogate might ingest some harmful drug, like some drug meant to cure morning sickness.

Umm, I don't think it's propaganda at all. Just because something is natural doesn't necessarily make it easy. I loved being pregnant and was fascinated with all the changes within my body and then growing this little baby that I could feel, gosh, I thought I'd invented pregnancy. I do wish the birth itself weren't as difficult, but thank God for modern medicine. I also loved nursing my babies--just to gaze upon them and knowing how amazing the body functions was a glimpse into the mind of God.

Each woman is unique. I know a few women who delivered their babies at home with just their husbands and midwives, the older children packed off to the grandparents. But most women I know have their babies in hospitals. When I was in labor with my first, four women came after me and had their babies within a few hours. I was soooo jealous. But I know I had it better than others who had harrowing labors. The worst is when either the mother or baby dies due to complications--unbelievably sad.

As to the use of surrogates, never, never, never. Before my husband and I got married we talked about what we'd do if we couldn't have kids and we knew we'd adopt. Using a surrogate is the most unnatural thing in the world to mix the sperm and egg in a petri dish and then implant it in another woman. Unnecessary complications and drama and risks (the biggest one being that the surrogate falling in love with the baby and refusing to give him or her up). Literature is full of these stories (the oldest one that comes to mind is the story of the Egyptian slave Hagar who bore Ishmael for Sarah, wife of Abraham). Who needs that in real life? But it makes good fiction, esp. cautionary tales. JMHO
« Last Edit: April 14, 2019, 07:28:05 AM by Vijaya »

Author of over 60 books and 60 magazine pieces, primarily for children
Vijaya Bodach | Personal Blog | Bodach Books
 

Kate Elizabeth

Was I happy the whole time that I was pregnant?  No way.  But there was joy there the whole time, that I would have a lovely baby at the end.  I remember being amazed at my children each hiccuping in my womb, the kicks, rolls, and everything else.  I had 22 hours of back labor with my daughter, before a C-section where she was breech.  With my son, I had a scheduled C-section, but he ended up being 2.5 weeks early (still had the C-section).  After I gave birth each time, for a while I missed having the baby inside me.  Nine months of gestating a human will do that to you.

As for a surrogate, only in a desperate (to my husband and me) situation.
 

cecilia_writer

I found it wonderful and frightening. Although I had a very anxious pregnancy the first time (my blood pressure went up about halfway through and wouldn't go down again, and I spent a lot of time resting, I loved feeling the baby move inside me, and fortunately my blood pressure didn't cause any damage and I gave birth quite easily in about 3 hours.
Cecilia Peartree - Woman of Mystery