Author Topic: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use  (Read 741 times)

Jan Hurst-Nicholson

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Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« on: October 26, 2018, 12:43:28 AM »
Iím preparing to make a print version of my book. Itís British spelling, so I want to make sure that any changes are correct for British use.
 
Which examples here should be practice?



Practise your speech by reading your notes out aloud.

Remember that a speech usually takes longer in real time than in practise, so allow for this.

Preparation and practise can give you confidence.

Gestures help to illustrate or emphasise your words or ideas, and with practise you can use them to advantage in your speech.

Practise your timing by mentally counting one, two, or one, two, three.

You should also practise projecting your voice without a microphone in case of a power failure

You might have to practise this so that it looks natural

Make sure to practise reading it aloud

Practise by doing mock interviews with family or friends.

It takes a particular skill to be able to describe what you are doing while still interacting with an audience, and this takes practise.

Practise your demonstration in front of trusted family members or friends and ask for honest feedback.

Make a list of everything you used during your practise so that you can tick it off during preparation.

Thanks in advance.

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Victoria

Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2018, 01:02:42 AM »
The ones, I believe should be practice and not practise are (but I could be wrong :) ):

Remember that a speech usually takes longer in real time than in practise, so allow for this.

Preparation and practise can give you confidence.

It takes a particular skill to be able to describe what you are doing while still interacting with an audience, and this takes practise.

Make a list of everything you used during your practise so that you can tick it off during preparation.

 

cecilia_writer

Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2018, 01:34:20 AM »
Practise is the verb and practice is the noun.
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Jan Hurst-Nicholson

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Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2018, 02:35:31 AM »
Practise is the verb and practice is the noun.

Thanks  :Tup2:. I understand that - but I'm still confused  :icon_redface:

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cecilia_writer

Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2018, 03:41:51 AM »
Where you're saying 'with' 'or 'in' it's a noun so 'in practice' and 'with practice'.
Also 'preparation and practice', 'this takes practice' and 'during your practice' - but if you wanted to use a verb here you could say 'while you're practising'.
As a verb it's 'to practise', 'you should practise' 'and 'Practise your demonstration'.

(Both versions look wrong now, of course, but the difference is definitely noun vs verb in British English)
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Jan Hurst-Nicholson

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Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2018, 11:43:14 PM »
Where you're saying 'with' 'or 'in' it's a noun so 'in practice' and 'with practice'.
Also 'preparation and practice', 'this takes practice' and 'during your practice' - but if you wanted to use a verb here you could say 'while you're practising'.
As a verb it's 'to practise', 'you should practise' 'and 'Practise your demonstration'.

(Both versions look wrong now, of course, but the difference is definitely noun vs verb in British English)

Thanks. I think I've got it in this instance, but still very confusing  :icon_rolleyes:

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Lee

Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2018, 03:01:33 PM »
The best method I found is to temporarily replace the word with advise and advice. This usually helps you figure it out even if it doesn't make sense in context.

Then again, grammar isn't my strong point :)
 
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Jan Hurst-Nicholson

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Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2018, 11:47:28 PM »
The best method I found is to temporarily replace the word with advise and advice. This usually helps you figure it out even if it doesn't make sense in context.

Then again, grammar isn't my strong point :)

Good idea - but I think I might confuse myself even more  :dizzy

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Doglover

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Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2018, 04:17:43 PM »
I wouldn't dream of using practise for anything. It is the American spelling; it is never used in English. Practice is the only one to use.

Advice and advise are two completely different words with different meanings. Advise has a zee sound; advice has a soft sizzle sound. Practice never has a zee sound.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2018, 05:29:05 PM by Doglover »
 

cecilia_writer

Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2018, 05:23:59 PM »
There are various online sources so I will just pick one:
http://www.gcse.com/english/practice.htm
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spin52

Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2018, 01:39:34 AM »
I wouldn't dream of using practise for anything. It is the American spelling; it is never used in English. Practice is the only one to use.



Um, no. Americans don't use practise, only practice. In English usage, practise is the verb, practice is the noun, although I admit you often see practice used as a verb these days.


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Becca Mills

Re: Practice/practise. Need some advice re British use
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2018, 03:33:08 AM »
I wouldn't dream of using practise for anything. It is the American spelling; it is never used in English. Practice is the only one to use.

Um, no. Americans don't use practise, only practice. In English usage, practise is the verb, practice is the noun, although I admit you often see practice used as a verb these days.

Yup. The "s" form is never used in the U.S.
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