Author Topic: Change in Strategy  (Read 610 times)

Al Macy (aka TromboneAl)

Change in Strategy
« on: September 27, 2018, 09:26:44 AM »
I embraced the "get the words down and them edit" idea, and I wrote the first drafts of of my last four books in one month each.
But I'm finding that I like my first drafts and don't end up changing them very much. For the next one, I may take more time with the first draft.

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Lex

Re: Change in Strategy
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2018, 10:50:02 AM »
This is the main way I've sped up my process. When I start editing during the first draft phase, I'm basically procrastinating. "Hey, I don't need to write new words. I can just spend all day tinkering with the ones I've already written!"
 
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She-la-te-da

Re: Change in Strategy
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2018, 07:15:05 PM »
Sometimes, when you turn off the internal critic, you find that you can write better, cleaner drafts and not need to edit much. Trusting in yourself, your skills and your creativity isn't a bad thing.
I write various flavors of speculative fiction. This is my main pen name.

 
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dikim

Re: Change in Strategy
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2019, 07:37:03 AM »
The number of drafts you need depends on how you work. I plot carefully before I start so my first draft is usually pretty much as I want it.  I know other authors who hardly plot at all but do lots of rewrites after their first draft.

If you're not sure if your first draft is okay, try leaving it for a couple of weeks and then coming back to it or ask someone whose opinion you trust to read it for you. 


Author of more than 40 books and several scripts. Writes fiction and non-fiction for children, young adults, adults and other writers.
www.dianakimpton.co.uk
 
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Eugene Lloyd MacRae

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Re: Change in Strategy
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2019, 08:44:25 AM »
Sometimes, when you turn off the internal critic, you find that you can write better, cleaner drafts and not need to edit much. Trusting in yourself, your skills and your creativity isn't a bad thing.
I agree. Just trust yourself and how you're developing as a writer, Al. Do a clean first draft - cycle and edit as you go - and move on to your next book.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2019, 01:06:06 AM by Eugene Lloyd MacRae »
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Denise

Re: Change in Strategy
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2019, 12:40:48 AM »
Really? I've done this for my previous two books and then when I'm done I hate it when I look at the mess I have (which isn't as much of a mess, but needs some line editing).

I had decided to change my strategy and edit as I go, meaning editing what I wrote the previous day, then going forward. The idea is that, at the end, I wouldn't have such a messy lump. But it's true that my messy, jotted down first drafts didn't get a lot of rewrites, just a couple adjustments here and there and some line editing, so maybe going forward with the first draft without looking back works.

And Lex is write that editing in the middle of writing can be a way to procrastinate.

I think I'll go back to jotting down the first draft quickly.

Thanks for helping me see the light.

Al, if your first drafts are good enough you can continue doing it the way you're doing.
 

L_Loryn

Re: Change in Strategy
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2019, 02:40:12 AM »
I spend a lot of time on my first drafts because, well, I don't see them as first drafts. I never do a second draft, whatever that is. I write it, then I edit it (mostly grammar), and then I send it to my editor. I do a detailed outline and then I get to work and what I finish, barring small changes, is what I stick with. I do not edit as I'm writing, though. I don't even look back at the previous days words unless I'm trying to get back in the right head space.

When I get to my editing phase, it's mostly grammar, editing some confusing passages, and beefing up detail in areas where I got stuck and forced myself to crank out words instead of wallow in my stuckness. And I check the timeline, too. I also look back at notes I've made in the google-doc margins of things I didn't want to look up as I was writing.

I couldn't imagine editing as I'm writing. It would kill the creative fun of, y'know, writing.
 

angelapepper

Re: Change in Strategy
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2019, 02:51:58 AM »
I find it fun to change my methods a bit with each book. There is something to be said for changing things just to keep it interesting for yourself, whether it's more efficient or more fun or not.

I don't find the One True Way and commit to it forever and ever. I mix up how much time I spend on outlines versus first or second drafts. The books probably feel a bit different because of that, but that's cool, too.